Online Courses

Welcome to the Online Courses!

This Section is the new home for University of Hawaii at Mānoa's Pacific Emergency Management, Preparedness, and Response Information Network and Training Services (Pacific EMPRINTS) Program. The San Diego State University's Institute for Public Health has partnered with Pacific EMPRINTS since 2005. Pacific EMPRINTS offers online courses to help healthcare professionals to better recognize and respond to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive events and to other large-scale public health emergencies.

Participants receive a SDSU IPH Certificate of Completion at no additional cost for each course completed.

Nursing CEs, CHES®-CECHS, and/or MCHES®-CECHs are available for select courses, at a nominal fee.

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Cardiac Risk Assessment In Youth

CME: 2.0 Nursing CE: 2.4
Duration: 2 hrs. (copyright IPH & EP Save A Life All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Physicians, Nurses


This course covers youth cardiac health with specific focus on comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and subsequent follow-up for risk for sudden cardiac arrest. The course was presented by John Rogers, MD, cardiologist at Scripps Health and President of the San Diego chapter at the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Association.

Disclosure: The presenter has no relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Creation of the course was funded by the Eric Paredes Save a Life Foundation (EPSAL).

Objectives

After completing this module, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the conditions associated with SCA in youth
  • Recognize the warning signs and risk factors and discuss with parents and at-risk youth
  • Conduct a robust, effective cardiac risk assessment in youth
  • Make appropriate referrals for follow-up cardiac testing
  • Discuss how health care providers can play a role in public education and advocacy
  • Empower youth to be their own heart health advocates

CME

Accreditation Statement: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine and the Institute for Public Health. The University of California, Irvine School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation Statement: The University of California, Irvine School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 2 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Bioterrorism

Introduction to Biological Agents/Case Study

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hr (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Physicians, Nurses, Dentists, Pharmacists, Veterinarians, Emergency Medical Services personnel, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Biological Agents” is designed to give you a brief overview the Category A biological agents: anthrax, botulism, plague, smallpox, and the viral hemorrhagic fevers, Category B biological agnet: ricin, and the potential to be used as a biological weapon of terror: tularemia.

  • Anthrax tutorial covers cutaneous, gastrointestinal and inhalational anthrax, gives treatment recommendations for the different types of anthrax exposures, and discusses the anthrax vaccine.
  • Botulism tutorial covers the forms of botulism, its use as a bioweapon, Botox, its clinical presentation and treatment of botulism poisoning.
  • Plague tutorial covers the different types of plague with a focus on pneumonic plague. It covers pneumonic plague’s signs and symptoms, diagnosis, mortality rate and treatment.
  • Smallpox tutorial covers the routes of infection, its uses as a bioweapon, its clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, and treatment options. Smallpox vaccinations and adverse reactions associated with the vaccine will also be discussed.
  • The viral hemorrhagic fevers covers the families of viruses, their general epidemiology, routes of infection, clinical presentations and treatments. It also looks at several specific viral hemorrhagic fevers, such as Ebola, Marburg and Lassa Fevers.
  • Ricin tutorial covers the routes of infection, its uses as a bioweapon, and its clinical presentation and treatment.
  • Tularemia tutorial covers the epidemiology, associated illnesses, prevention and treatment.

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology, based on a presentation by Michael Tiberg, “Assessing Current Threats: Biological Agents.” Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. List the three types of anthrax exposure
  2. List the two antibiotics commonly recommended for anthrax treatment
  3. List the pros and cons of utilization of the anthrax vaccine
  4. List the three forms of botulism
  5. List two signs of a potential botulism biological attack
  6. Identify the pharmaceutical treatment appropriate for a case of botulism
  7. List the three types of plague
  8. List the preferred antibiotics for treatment of plague
  9. List the three routes of infection for the ricin toxin
  10. Identify the appropriate personal protective equipment for use with ricin-infected patients
  11. Differentiate between the clinical presentations of smallpox and chickenpox
  12. Identify the risks associated with smallpox vaccinations
  13. List three ways that tularemia can be naturally contracted
  14. Identify the most dangerous clinical syndrome associated with tularemia
  15. Identify the antibiotics commonly used to treat tularemia
  16. List the four families of viral hemorrhagic fevers
  17. Identify the main differential diagnosis for viral hemorrhagic fevers
  18. Identify the only pharmaceutical treatment available for viral hemorrhagic fevers.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. List the Category A biological agents and describe their epidemiology, associated illnesses, and treatments.
2. Knowledge of the pharmaceutics and pharmaceuticals used to combat CBRNE agents.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area VII: Communicate, Promote, and Advocate for Health, Health Education/Promotion, and the Profession
7.2 Engage in advocacy for health and health education/promotion


Introduction to Bioterrorism for Hawaii

Nursing CE: 1.2 CHES®-CECH: 1.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1 hr (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Physicians, Nurses, Dentists, Pharmacists, Veterinarians, Emergency Medical Services personnel, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Introduction to Bioterrorism for Hawaii” is designed to give you a brief overview of the history of bioterrorism, biological agents currently of the greatest concern, main routes of infection, and overall preparedness efforts of the United States and specifically, Hawaii. The sequence tutorials, “Terrorism in Hawaii: Applying the Knowledge,” explores the questions and consequences evoked by a terrorist incident in Hawaii using a modified version of a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) format, previously completed by multidisciplinary groups of health care students and professionals. The PBL is a process of self-directed learning through identification and research of issues relevant to particular disciplines.

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. The PBL tutorials were created with the aid of Seiji Yamada, MD, MPH. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Category A, B & C biological agent designations.
  2. List the three routes of infection for biological agents.
  3. List three issues that Hawaii needs to overcome in order to be prepared for disaster.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. Preparedness Evaluation: Describe evaluation activities.
2. List the major classes of weapons and prevention strategies for each of them.
3. List the Category A biological agents, and describe their epidemiology, associated illnesses and treatments.
4. Demonstrate the ability to complete physical examinations that identify signs associated with exposure to CBRNE agents.
5. Demonstrate the ability to incorporate evidence-based diagnostic procedures and laboratory studies to confirm the diagnoses and/or causative agents.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area VII: Communicate, Promote, and Advocate for Health, Health Education/Promotion, and the Profession
7.2 Engage in advocacy for health and health education/promotion


Chemical Terrorism

Introduction to Chemical Agents/Case Study

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hr (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, Other Emergency Medical Services personnel


The course “Chemical Agents” is designed to give a brief overview of the history of chemical agent use, chemical agent characteristics, routes of exposure, routes of dissemination, and chemical agent categories. Chemical agent exposure identification and decontamination for healthcare professionals will also be discussed. Five sequence tutorials cover blister, blood, chocking incapacitating and nerve agents. The sequence tutorials, “Chemical Weapons in Hawaii: Applying the Knowledge,” explores the questions and consequences evoked by a chemical weapons attack in the Ala Moana Shopping Center in Hawaii using a modified version of a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) format, previously completed by multidisciplinary groups of health care students and professionals. The PBL is a process of self-directed learning through identification and research of issues relevant to particular disciplines.

  • The tutorial “Blister Agents” covers a brief overview of the types of blister agents, the effects of blister agent exposure, and treatment for blister agent exposure.
  • The tutorial “Blood Agents” covers a brief overview of the mechanism of action for cyanide-based blood agents, the effects of cyanide-based blood agent exposure, and treatment for cyanide-based blood agent exposure, as well as treatment side effects and considerations for healthcare providers.
  • The tutorial “Choking Agents” covers a brief overview of the mechanism of action for choking agents, the effects of choking agent exposure, and treatment for choking agent exposure, as well as a more in-depth look at phosgene and considerations for healthcare providers.
  • The tutorial “Incapacitating Agents” covers a brief overview of the three main types of incapacitating agents: hallucinogens, vomiting agents and riot control agents. A slightly more in-depth look at riot control agents will include their uses, clinical effects, and treatment options.
  • The tutorial “Nerve Agents” covers a brief overview of mechanism of action for nerve agents, the effects of nerve agent exposure, the different types of nerve agents, and treatment for nerve agent exposure. The sarin Tokyo subway attacks of 1995 will also be briefly discussed.
This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. The PBL tutorials were created with the aid of Dr. Seiji Yamada, Dr. Ed Kalinowski, and Megan Inada. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the categories of chemical agents, possible routes of chemical agent exposure, and possible chemical agent dissemination mechanisms
  2. Describe decontamination procedures for a victim of a chemical agent exposure
  3. Describe the effects of blister agent exposure
  4. Identify appropriate treatment measures for victims of blister agent exposure
  5. Identify the mechanism of action for cyanide-based blood agents
  6. Describe the effects of cyanide-based blood agent exposure
  7. Identify the mechanism of action for choking agents
  8. Describe the effects of choking agent exposure
  9. Identify the three main types of incapacitating agents
  10. Describe the major uses of riot control agents
  11. Identify the mechanism of action for nerve agents
  12. Describe the effects of nerve agent exposure.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. List the major classes of chemical agents associated with potential terrorist activity and describe their routes of exposure, associated illnesses, and treatments.
2. Demonstrate the ability to rule out, when possible, or determine an accurate diagnosis of exposure to CBRNE agents.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions


Disaster Mental Health

Psychological First Aid (PFA) & Disaster Behavioral Health

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hr (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, Other Emergency Medical Services personnel


The online course “Psychological First Aid (PFA) & Disaster Behavioral Health" starts with the presentation “PFA: Helping People Cope During Disasters and Public Health Emergencies” delivered by Mr. Jack Herrmann. The presentation covers some of the human impacts of disasters, and describes the core components of Psychological First Aid, as well as the differences between Psychological First Aid and Psychological Debriefing. This presentation was recorded at Pacific EMPRINTS’ Pacific Preparedness Conference: Capacity Building to Address Vulnerable Populations. This Conference was funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

The sequence tutorial “Disaster Behavioral Health: Addressing the Mental Health Needs of Trauma Survivors” gives a brief overview of the common responses and long-term reactions to trauma, and brief guidelines for interacting with survivors of trauma. This tutorial was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Creation of the course was funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this online course, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe what PFA is and why it is important.
  2. Identify the core components of PFA.
  3. Identify the expected psychological reactions to trauma.
  4. Identify potential long-term reactions to trauma.
  5. Utilize mental health interventions appropriate to level of expertise.
  6. Manage stress reactions associated with responding to trauma incidents.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. Explain the concepts of and describe functional response roles for one’s profession, health agencies, and community members.
2. List and describe the public health interventions that are part of a response to surveillance signals.
3. Demonstrate familiarity with a range of resources to address delayed or critical incident stress among community members or responders.
4. Explain the concepts of risk communication.
5. Identify the signs and symptoms of acute or delayed critical incident stress reaction among community members or responders.

for Health Education Specialists

Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area VI: Serve as Health Education/Promotion Resource Person
6.2 Train others to use health education/promotion skills
Area VII: Communicate, Promote and Advocate for Health, Health Education/Promotion and the Profession
7.2 Engage in advocacy for health and health education/promotion


Disaster Preparedness and Response

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hr (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, Other Emergency Medical Services personnel


The course “Disaster Triage” is designed to give a brief overview of the type of triage potentially used in large-scale bio-events.

  • Introduction to Triage and Public Health: Healthcare Response to Disasters features an interview with Dr. Kristine Qureshi, RN, CEN, DNSc. Topics covered include mass casualty incident triage, epidemic triage, reverse triage, and the role of public health in disaster response.
  • Disaster Triage for Epidemics describes an algorithm for triage along with a brief discussion of the ethical and moral conflicts that may arise as a result of triage.
  • Disaster Triage for Mass Casualty Incidents (MCIs) gives a brief overview of the type of triage used in disasters such as Mass Casualty Incidents, in order to do the greatest good for the greatest number of afflicted. It covers disaster triage tags, as well as primary and secondary triage.
  • Disaster Triage Exercises provide several case examples of situations in which disaster triage for mass casualty incidents and disaster triage for epidemics might be used. Basic principles of these types of triage are reiterated, and several cases are discussed and explained.

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Creation of the course was funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe mass casualty incident triage categories.
  2. Understand the basic outline of the START Triage Algorithm.
  3. Differentiate between mass casualty incident triage, epidemic triage, and reverse triage.
  4. Utilize the SEIRV epidemic triage algorithm.
  5. Differentiate epidemic triage from Mass Casualty Incident triage.
  6. Describe the Disaster Triage Tag system.
  7. Utilize the START Triage Algorithm.
  8. Apply disaster triage for mass casualty incidents to a given scenario.
  9. Apply disaster triage for epidemics to a given scenario.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. Explain the concepts of and describe functional response roles for one’s profession, health agencies, and community members.
2. List and describe the public health interventions that are part of a response to surveillance signals.
3. Explain the concept of the Incident Command System.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health.
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices


Emergency Preparedness for the Dental Profession

Nursing CE: 1.2 CHES®-CECH: 1.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1 hr (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Dentists, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Emergency Preparedness for the Dental Profession” is designed to give you a brief overview of CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive) agents, and the role that the dental profession plays in preparing for and managing CBRNE events.

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology with the aid of Dr. Patsy Fujimoto. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. List the major classes of weapons and several characteristics associated with them.
  2. Describe the functional response roles that dentists may take in the event of an emergency.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. List the major classes of weapons and prevention strategies for each of them.
2. Describe the functional response roles of for one’s profession.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health.
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices


Point-of-Care Strategies for Disaster Preparedness

Nursing CE: 1.2 CHES®-CECH: 1.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1 hr (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, Lab Managers, Medical Technologists, Emergency Medical Services personnel


This online course “Point-of-Care Strategies: Critical Care, Disaster Medicine, and Public Health Preparedness Worldwide” by Gerald Kost, MD, PhD, MS, FACB Director, Point-of-Care Testing Center for Teaching and Research, Director, Principal Investigator, UC Davis – Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Point-of-Care Technologies Center at UC Davis, California provides an introduction to point-of-care testing (POCT), how POCT can be used for acute care decision-making in acute care and rural settings, and what lessons have been learned about POCT from recent disasters. The mission and philosophy of the POC Technologies Research Network [NIBIB, NIH] also is discussed, along with the visual examples of POCT. The course concludes with recommendations for emergency preparedness with integrated POCT technologies.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Define point-of-care testing (POCT).
  2. Identify several weaknesses of current POC technology.
  3. Understand how POCT can be used optimally within small-world networks.
  4. Recognize how POC technology can improve disaster preparedness and response efforts.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. Demonstrate the ability to incorporate evidence-based diagnostic procedures and laboratory studies to confirm the diagnoses and/or causative agents.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data


Geographic Information Systems

Introduction to Geographic Information Technologies for Emergency Planning and Response

Nursing CE: 2.4 CHES®-CECH: 2.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 2 hrs (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: First Responders, Practicing Health Professionals, Administrators, Emergency/Disaster Planners, Emergency Medical Services personnel, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Introduction to Geographic Information Technologies for Emergency Planning and Response” is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of geographic information technologies their applied use in emergency planning and response.

  • “Introduction to Geographic Information Technologies” tutorials cover geographic information systems, the global positioning system, geospatial data, and the role these and related technologies have in meeting federal mandates for preparedness and response. Case studies and scenario-based examples are presented that reinforce geospatial concepts and highlight the practical applications of geospatial tools and data in emergency planning and response.
  • “Understanding GIS Coordinate Systems” tutorial is designed to give you a basic understanding of how geographic information systems use coordinate systems to tie GIS data to particular locations on the earth, and of the coordinate systems commonly used in the United States. Its topics include geographic and plane coordinate systems, datums and ellipsoids, the UTM coordinate system, the US State Plane coordinate system, and coordinate system best practices for emergency management applications.
  • “Introduction to the Global Positioning System” tutorial is designed to provide you with a basic understanding of the Global Positioning System, its components, and how they work together to provide users with a navigation, mapping, and timing tool that can determine and record 3-dimensional positions anywhere on or near the Earth’s surface. Topics include overview of system and general applications, GPS satellites and receivers, satellite ranging and position measurement, sources of error in position measurements, ways to improve accuracy of position measurements, and advances in GPS technology.
  • “Global Positioning System Technology ” tutorial uses applied examples to highlight the many ways GPS technology contributes to public safety and health and emergency response. General topic areas include navigation and mapping, incident reporting, resource management and allocation, damage assessment, and hazard monitoring. Within each of these areas, several examples are provided from real disaster events, emergency situations, and monitoring systems that reinforce the Global Positioning System’s critical role in assisting first responders, health professionals, disaster managers, and scientists with the protection of life and property, hazard mitigation, and disaster recovery.
  • “The US National Grid for Emergency Response” tutorial is designed to give you a basic understanding of the purpose and use of the US National Grid, and it’s value to emergency response situations.
This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. List and describe geographic information technology components
  2. List emergency planning and response functions supported by geographic information technologies
  3. Understand the role geographic information technologies have in meeting federal mandates for preparedness and response
  4. Describe practical applications of geospatial technologies to emergency planning and response
  5. List the common GIS coordinate systems used in the US
  6. Describe geographic and plane coordinate systems
  7. List the components of a fully specified coordinate system
  8. Understand how positions are referenced in the UTM and US State Plane coordinate systems
  9. List and describe the basic components of the Global Positioning System
  10. Understand and describe how the Global Positioning System calculates positions
  11. List and describe the common sources of error in GPS position measurements
  12. List and describe techniques for improving GPS position accuracy
  13. Describe recent and forthcoming advances in GPS technology
  14. List and describe general areas in which global positioning system technology supports public safety and health and emergency response
  15. Describe practical, specific applications of global positioning system technology in public safety and health and emergency response fields
  16. Understand how global positioning system technology is integrated with existing and emerging public health and safety systems, hazard monitoring networks, emergency preparedness plans, and response protocols
  17. Describe the purpose of the US National Grid
  18. Explain its advantages for emergency response operations
  19. Specify positions using the US National Grid system
  20. List requirements for US National Grid position references
  21. List best practices for employing US National Grid position references

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.2 Access existing information and data related to health
Area IV: Conduct Evaluation and Research Related to Health Education/Promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
Area V: Administer and Manage Health Education/Promotion
5.2 Manage technology resources

Homeland Security Target Capabilities List, in part, related by this course

1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Prevent: Information Gathering and Recognition of Indicators & Warnings
4. Prevent: Information Sharing and Dissemination
5. Prevent: Intelligence Analysis and Production
6. Protect: Epidemiologic Surveillance and Investigation
7. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
8. Respond: Emergency Operations Center Management
9. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
10. Respond: Environmental Health
11. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)
12. Respond: On-site Incident Management
13. Respond: Responder Health and Safety
14. Respond: Urban Search and Rescue
15. Respond: WMD/Hazardous Materials Response and Decontamination
16. Respond: Firefighting Operations/Support


ArcGIS Exercise: Chemical Plume Modeling & Threat Zone Analysis

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hr (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Administrators, Emergency/Disaster Planners, First Responders, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Chemical Plume Modeling & Threat Zone Analysis” is designed to give you a basic understanding of how to integrate the ALOHA chemical dispersion modeling software and ArcGIS geographic information system tools to analyze the effects of a chemical release. The exercise is based on the Homeland Security National Planning Scenario #8, “Chemical Attack – Chlorine Tank Explosion.” It is an exercise in tutorial format, with step by step instructions utilizing data for the island of O`ahu.

The exercise requires access to ArcGIS ArcView version 9.2as well as ALOHA 5.4 (provided), and ALOHA ArcMap 9.2 Footprint Import Tool (provided).. Evaluation copies of the software are available at the following URL: http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis/arcview/eval/evalcd.html

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Generate a chemical dispersion threat footprint using ALOHA software
  2. Intergrate the ALOHA output within ArcGIS as a set of GIS data layers
  3. Combine GIS query and selection operations to calculate estimates of evacuation populations
  4. Generate an evacuation zone map based on the chemical threat footprint

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
4. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
5. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)
6. Respond: On-site Incident Management
7. Respond: Responder Health and Safety
8. Respond: WMD/Hazardous Materials Response and Decontamination

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


ArcGIS Exercise: Chemical Terrorism Risk & Evacuation Assessment

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hr (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Administrators, Emergency/Disaster Planners, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Chemical Terrorism Risk and Evacuation Assessment” is designed to give you a basic understanding of how to apply ArcGIS geographic information system tools to map and analyze multiple hazard threat zones and estimate at-risk households and evacuation populations as a result of a chemical terrorism scenario involving potential bomb blasts and subsequent releases of chlorine gas. It is an exercise in tutorial format, with step-by-step instructions utilizing data for the island of O`ahu.

The exercise requires access to ArcGIS ArcView version 9.1, 9.2, or ArcGIS desktop and the Spatial Analyst extension. Please check whether your system is supported by ArcGIS. Evaluation copies of the software are available at the following URL: https://www.esri.com/en-us/arcgis/products/arcgis-pro/overview

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Utilize GIS proximity tools to generate evacuation zones around blast sources
  2. Use GIS data join and overlay operations to combine population data from multiple sources
  3. Combine GIS selection, overlay, and statistics tools to estimate at-risk populations, households and housing units
  4. Apply GIS proximity and raster analysis tools to identify and map the potential chlorine gas exposure areas around multiple chemical release sources

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
4. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
5. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)
6. Respond: On-site Incident Management
7. Respond: Responder Health and Safety
8. Respond: WMD/Hazardous Materials Response and Decontamination

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


ArcGIS Exercise: Dengue Fever & West Nile Virus Monitoring & Mitigation

CHES®-CECH: 1.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1 hr (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Administrators, Emergency/Disaster Planners, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Dengue Fever and West Nile Virus Monitoring and Mitigation” is designed to give you a basic understanding of how to apply ArcGIS geographic information system tools to monitor and map the spatial distribution of dengue fever and West Nile virus cases, map disease vector habitat ranges, and identify and map potential mosquito breeding areas in an effort to mitigate the effects of a dual Dengue Fever / West Nile virus outbreak. It is an exercise in tutorial format, with step-by-step instructions utilizing data for the island of O`ahu.

The exercise requires access to ArcGIS ArcView version 9.1, 9.2, or later. Evaluation copies of the software are available at the following URL: https://www.esri.com/en-us/arcgis/products/arcgis-pro/overview

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Utilize GIS tools to display XY locations from tabular data sources
  2. Use GIS query tools to distinguish and map disease types based on table attributes
  3. Apply GIS proximity tools to map habitat ranges around disease vector source locations
  4. Combine GIS overlay selection operations and proximity tools to identify and map potential disease vector breeding areas

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
4. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
5. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)
6. Respond: On-site Incident Management
7. Respond: Responder Health and Safety
8. Respond: WMD/Hazardous Materials Response and Decontamination

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


ArcGIS Exercise: Dengue Outbreak Analysis Using Spatial Statistics

Nursing CE: 2.4 CHES®-CECH: 2.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 2 hrs (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Administrators, Epidemiologists, Emergency/Disaster Planners, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Dengue Outbreak Analysis Using Spatial Statistics” is designed to give you a basic understanding of how to apply ArcGIS geographic information system tools to analyze and map the geographic and temporal distribution of dengue-positive households and mosquito trap counts relative to other population and environmental datasets in order to monitor, quantify, and understand the spatial diffusion of the disease and its vectors during a Dengue outbreak scenario. It is an exercise in tutorial format, with step-by-step instructions utilizing data for the island of O`ahu.

It requires access to ArcGIS ArcInfo version 9.1, 9.2, or later, and the Spatial Analyst extension. Evaluation copies of the software are available at the ESRI. Click https://www.esri.com/en-us/arcgis/products/arcgis-pro/overview.

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Utilize GIS tools to map disease occurrences by date
  2. Combine GIS overlay, statistics, and table join operations to measure and map the frequency of disease occurrences by Census units
  3. Use GIS spatial analyst tools to map the spatial density of disease occurrences
  4. Apply GIS tools to map disease vector counts over time and use spatial statistics tools to identify and map spatial clusters (hotspots) of disease vectors
  5. Apply spatial statistics tools to quantify and map geographic distributions and directional trends of disease occurrences over time and relative to other population and environmental datasets

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
4. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
5. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)
6. Respond: On-site Incident Management
7. Respond: Responder Health and Safety
8. Respond: WMD/Hazardous Materials Response and Decontamination

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


Nursing CE: 1.2 CHES®-CECH: 1.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1 hr (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Administrators, Emergency/Disaster Planners, Emergency Medical Services personnel, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Geocoding Health Facilities” is designed to give you a basic understanding of how to use ArcGIS geographic information system tools to create a GIS dataset from a list of addresses, a utility that is useful for many different emergency planning and response applications. It is an exercise in tutorial format, with step by step instructions. The example data used for the exercise is a list of health facility addresses for Hawai`i.

It requires access to ArcGIS ArcView version 9.1, 9.2, or later. Evaluation copies of the software are available at the following URL: https://www.esri.com/en-us/arcgis/products/arcgis-pro/overview

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Use ArcGIS to set up an address locator and set the address matching parameters to prepare for address geocoding.
  2. Use ArcGIS to process a file of address locations and convert them to a GIS data layer.
  3. Review the address geocoding results and investigate any unmatched addresses.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
4. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
5. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)
6. Respond: On-site Incident Management
7. Respond: Responder Health and Safety
8. Respond: WMD/Hazardous Materials Response and Decontamination

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


The material covered in this course is related, in part, to the following capabilities from the Homeland Security Target Capabilities List:
1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Prevent: Information Gathering and Recognition of Indicators & Warnings
4. Prevent: Information Sharing and Dissemination
5. Prevent: Intelligence Analysis and Production
6. Protect: Epidemiologic Surveillance and Investigation
7. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
8. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
9. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)

ArcGIS Exercise: GIS Mapping for Vulnerable Populations in Emergencies

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hr (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Administrators, Emergency/Disaster Planners, Other Public Health personnel


The course “GIS Mapping for Vulnerable Populations in Emergencies” is designed to give you a basic understanding of how to apply ArcGIS geographic information system tools to map and identify vulnerable populations and facilities using different data sources and to map hazard events, create threat evacuation zones, and rapidly assess the potential total number of evacuees, affected facilities, and vulnerable populations in those threat and evacuation zones due to a mock earthquake and related hazard events. It is an exercise in tutorial format, with step-by-step instructions utilizing data for the island of O`ahu and the Wahiawa community. It requires access to ArcGIS ArcView version 9.2, or later. Evaluation copies of the software are available at the ESRI. Click https://www.esri.com/en-us/arcgis/products/arcgis-pro/overview.

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Utilize GIS tools to map US Census demographic data by Census block
  2. Combine table join, field calculation, and statistics operations to estimate total population and vulnerable population counts in community
  3. Use GIS tools to map facility locations based on tabular GPS coordinates
  4. Use address geocoding to map health facility and school locations based on a table of street addresses
  5. Apply spatial queries to rapidly determine number of emergency and health facilities and schools in community
  6. Use GIS proximity analysis tools to buffer a hazard event and create threat evacuation zones
  7. Combine GIS overlay, spatial queries, and table statistics tools to estimate total number of evacuees in threat evacuation zones, identify affected facilities, and estimate vulnerable populations in affected facilities.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
4. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
5. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)
6. Respond: On-site Incident Management
7. Respond: Responder Health and Safety
8. Respond: WMD/Hazardous Materials Response and Decontamination

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


ArcGIS Exercise: Hurricane Shelter Analysis

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hr (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Administrators, Emergency/Disaster Planners, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Hurricane Shelter Analysis” is designed to give you a basic understanding of how to apply ArcGIS geographic information system tools to analyze the effects of a hurricane scenario on emergency shelters, and to estimate the potential evacuation population. It is an exercise in tutorial format, with step by step instructions utilizing data for the island of O`ahu.

It requires access to ArcGIS ArcView version 9.1, 9.2, or later. Evaluation copies of the software are available at the following URL: https://www.esri.com/en-us/arcgis/trial

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Utilize basic GIS overlay operations to combine separate hazard datasets into combined hazard layers
  2. Apply hazard layers to emergency shelter locations to determine usable and unusable shelters
  3. Combine GIS query and selection operations to calculate estimates of evacuation populations
  4. Combine shelter location and population datasets with neighborhood boundaries to estimate shelter capacity by neighborhood

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
4. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
5. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)
6. Respond: On-site Incident Management
7. Respond: Responder Health and Safety
8. Respond: WMD/Hazardous Materials Response and Decontamination

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


Nursing CE: 1.2 CHES®-CECH: 1.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1 hr (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Administrators, Emergency/Disaster Planners, Epidemiologists, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Tracking SARS Outbreak” is designed to give you a basic understanding of how to apply ArcGIS geographic information system tools to track the spatial and temporal distribution of a SARS outbreak scenario and identify and map hotspot areas with high concentrations of cases. It is an exercise in tutorial format, with step-by-step instructions utilizing simulated data for the island of O`ahu.

It requires access to ArcGIS ArcView version 9.1, 9.2, or later, and the Tracking Analyst and Spatial Analyst extensions. Evaluation copies of the software are available at the following URL: https://www.esri.com/en-us/arcgis/products/arcgis-pro/overview

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Utilize geographic data that has a temporal component
  2. Apply tracking analysis GIS tools to map and track the diffusion of disease cases over time
  3. Use tracking analysis animation tools to create animation files showing the disease distribution
  4. Use spatial analysis GIS tools to quickly identify areas of high to low concentrations of disease occurrence

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
4. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
5. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)
6. Respond: On-site Incident Management
7. Respond: Responder Health and Safety
8. Respond: WMD/Hazardous Materials Response and Decontamination

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


The material covered in this course is related, in part, to the following capabilities from the Homeland Security Target Capabilities List:
1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Prevent: Information Sharing and Dissemination
4. Protect: Epidemiologic Surveillance and Investigation
5. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
6. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
7. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)

Nursing CE: 3.0 CHES®-CECH: 2.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 2.5 hrs (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Administrators, Emergency/Disaster Planners, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Tsunami Runup Analysis” is designed to give you a basic understanding of how to apply ArcGIS geographic information system tools, including the Model Builder, to analyze the effects of a tsunami scenario on emergency shelters and public schools, and to estimate the potential evacuation population. It is an exercise in tutorial format, with step-by-step instructions utilizing data for the island of O`ahu.

The exercise requires access to ArcGIS ArcView version 9.1, 9.2, or later, and the Spatial Analyst extension. Evaluation copies of the software are available at the following URL: https://www.esri.com/en-us/arcgis/products/arcgis-pro/overview

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Utilize GIS tools and the ArcGIS Model Builder together with elevation data to automate the process of tsunami hazard and evacuation zone mapping
  2. Use GIS overlay operations within ArcGIS Model Builder to combine tsunami hazard zones with emergency shelters, schools, and population data
  3. Apply GIS query and selection operations to calculate estimates of evacuation populations
  4. Apply GIS query and selection operations to identify and map usable and unusable shelters

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
4. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
5. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)
6. Respond: On-site Incident Management
7. Respond: Responder Health and Safety
8. Respond: WMD/Hazardous Materials Response and Decontamination

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


The material covered in this course is related, in part, to the following capabilities from the Homeland Security Target Capabilities List:
1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Prevent: Information Gathering and Recognition of Indicators & Warnings
4. Prevent: Information Sharing and Dissemination
5. Prevent: Intelligence Analysis and Production
6. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
7. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
8. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)

ArcGIS Exercise: Vaccine Distribution Analysis

Nursing CE: 1.2 CHES®-CECH: 1.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1 hr (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Administrators, Emergency/Disaster Planners, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Vaccine Distribution Analysis” is designed to give you a basic understanding of how to apply ArcGIS geographic information system tools to provide logistical support for the distribution of vaccines during a smallpox epidemic scenario by solving road network, routing, and service area problems. It is an exercise in tutorial format, with step-by-step instructions utilizing data for the State of Hawai`i.

It requires access to ArcGIS ArcView version 9.1, 9.2, or later, and the Network Analyst extension. Evaluation copies of the software are available at the following URL: https://www.esri.com/en-us/arcgis/products/arcgis-pro/overview

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Use network analysis GIS tools to create network datasets from roads layers
  2. Apply network analysis tools and network datasets to find best vaccine distribution routes, alternative routes, and driving directions between airport locations and vaccination clinics
  3. Apply network analysis tools and network datasets to determine service areas around locations of emergency vaccination clinics and identify areas requiring mobile vaccination clinics

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
4. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
5. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)
6. Respond: On-site Incident Management
7. Respond: Responder Health and Safety
8. Respond: WMD/Hazardous Materials Response and Decontamination

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


The material covered in this course is related, in part, to the following capabilities from the Homeland Security Target Capabilities List:
1. Common: Communications
2. Common: Planning
3. Protect: Epidemiological Surveillance and Investigation
4. Respond: Critical Resource Logistics & Distribution
5. Respond: Emergency Public Information and Warning
6. Respond: Mass Care (Sheltering, Feeding, Related services)

Infectious Diseases

Avian and Swine Influenza Vaccinations

Nursing CE: 1.2 CHES®-CECH: 1.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1 hr (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, Other Emergency Medical Services personnel


The course “On the Frontline” features interviews with internationally recognized vaccine expert, Dr. Gregory A. Poland.

  • “Vaccine Development for Avian Influenza” covers the current status of vaccine development for Avian Influenza, the diagnosis and prevention of Avian Influenza, and the potential for Pandemic Influenza.
  • “Swine Influenza” covers the difference between swine influenza and seasonal influenza, the definition of a pandemic, the current status of vaccine development for swine influenza, and the diagnosis and prevention of swine influenza.

Gregory A. Poland, MD, FACP, FIDSA, has been the Director of the Program in Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense at the Department of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic since 2002, and is also an Associate Chair there. He is also the current Director of the Immunization Clinic and Services at the Mayo Clinic as well. For more information about Dr. Poland, please visit the Mayo Clinic’s website at mayoresearch.mayo.edu.

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this podcast, participants will be able to:

  1. Differentiate between the clinical presentations of Avian Influenza and seasonal influenza
  2. Identify preventive measures against Avian Influenza.
  3. Identify which medications are appropriate for treatment of Avian Influenza.
  4. Differentiate between the clinical presentations of swine influenza and seasonal influenza
Identify preventive measures against swine influenza. Identify which medications are appropriate for treatment of swine influenza.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. Demonstrate the ability to take medical histories that identify symptoms associated with exposure to CBRNE agents or other public health emergencies.
2. Demonstrate the ability to consider exposure to CBRNE agents or other public health emergencies when establishing differential diagnoses and developing problem lists.
3. Knowledge of the pharmaceutics and pharmaceuticals used to combat CBRNE agents or other public health emergencies.
4. Demonstrate the ability to recognize the need for, and to collect and preserve, forensic evidence from patients who may be victims of a CBRNE event or other public health emergency.
5. List and describe the public health interventions that are part of a response to surveillance signals.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices


Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hr (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, Other Emergency Medical Services personnel


The course “Infectious Diseases” is designed to give a brief overview of cholera, dengue, SARS, scrub typhus, and tuberculosis. “Introduction to Avian Influenza for Hawaii” tutorials are included in this course.

  • Cholera tutorial provides its method of transmission, epidemic status, and typical signs and symptoms associated with it. It also covers cholera treatment, as well as prevention strategies for limiting the incidence of cholera.
  • Dengue tutorial provides its method of transmission, and concentration area. Signs and symptoms associated with dengue, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome, as well as their treatment will also be covered. The tutorial concludes with a short discussion of the 2001 Hawaii dengue outbreak, and prevention and containment strategies that may be utilized to combat a dengue outbreak.
  • SARS tutorial covers its method of transmission, risk factors for contracting SARS, and the criteria for diagnosis of SARS. It also provides SARS treatment and prevention, as well as giving a brief synopsis of the 2003 SARS outbreak.
  • Scrub Typhus tutorial examines the mode of transmission, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of scrub typhus. Scrub typhus is a disease that is prevalent in the Pacific and currently there is no vaccine available. This tutorial is designed to give health professionals the ability to recognize and treat patients they come across that are infected with the disease.
  • Tuberculosis tutorial provides its method of transmission, and typical signs and symptoms associated with it. The tutorial also covers tuberculosis treatment, as well as an overview of MDR-TB and XDR-TB.
  • “Introduction to Avian Influenza for Hawaii” tutorials provides a basic overview of influenza its relationship to avian influenza and illustrates the importance of avian influenza to discussions of public health, and some treatment and prevention strategies against avian influenza.
This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. “Introduction to Avian Influenza for Hawaii” tutorials were based on the “Avian Influenza” course designed by Aaron Wendelboe of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Creation of the course was funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify how cholera transmission occurs.
  2. Institute appropriate preventative measures to decrease the likelihood of cholera transmission.
  3. Identify how dengue transmission occurs.
  4. Institute appropriate preventative measures to decrease the likelihood of dengue transmission.
  5. Identify the clinical and epidemiologic criteria for diagnosing SARS.
  6. Describe precautions that can be taken to prevent further transmission of SARS.
  7. Identify significant signs and symptoms that lead to a diagnosis of scrub typhus.
  8. Take appropriate preventative measures to reduce the likelihood of contracting scrub typhus.
  9. Differentiate between TB, MDR-TB, and XDR-TB.
  10. Identify various methods of testing for TB.
  11. List the steps of TB treatment.
  12. Gain an understanding of how Avian Influenza (AI) could pose a threat to the public’s health
  13. Gain an understanding of what AI is and how it relates to human influenza
  14. Gain knowledge of the epidemiology and transmissibility of AI

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. Institute appropriate steps to limit spread, including infection control.
2. Initiate patient care within your professional scope of practice.
3. Lists the governmental resources and outline the regulatory issues associated with emergency management and preparedness.
4. Lists and describes the public health interventions that are part of a response to surveillance signals.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area VII: Communicate, Promote, and Advocate for Health, Health Education/Promotion, and the Profession
7.2 Engage in advocacy for health and health education/promotion


Infectious Diseases - Applying the Knowledge (Part I)

Nursing CE: 2.4 CHES®-CECH: 2.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 2 hr (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Physicians, Nurses, Dentists, Pharmacists, Veterinarians, Emergency Medical Services personnel, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Infectious Diseases - Applying the Knowledge Part 1” is a modified version of a Problem-Based Learning or PBL case previously completed by multidisciplinary groups of health care students and professionals. PBL is a process of self-directed learning through identification and research of issues relevant to particular disciplines.

  • Pandemic Influenza explores the questions and consequences evoked by the potential arrival of Avian Influenza in the Hawaiian Islands.
  • Cholera in the Pacific explores the questions and consequences evoked by a potential outbreak of cholera in the Marshall Islands.
  • Scrub Typhus in the Pacific explores the questions and consequences evoked by a case of Scrub Typhus in the Republic of Palau.

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology with the aid of Dr. Seiji Yamada and Megan Inada. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify significant signs and symptoms that lead to a diagnosis of Avian Influenza
  2. Appropriately treat individuals who have been exposed to Avian Influenza
  3. Identify significant signs and symptoms that lead to a diagnosis of cholera
  4. Institute appropriate public health prevention measures to stop a cholera outbreak
  5. Identify significant signs and symptoms that lead to a diagnosis of Scrub Typhus
  6. Take appropriate preventative measures to reduce the likelihood of contracting Scrub Typhus

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. Demonstrate the ability to take medical histories that identify symptoms associated with exposure to CBRNE agents.
2. Demonstrate the ability to rule out, when possible, or determine an accurate diagnosis of exposure to CBRNE agents.
3. List and describe the public health interventions that are part of a response to surveillance signals.
5. Demonstrate the ability to incorporate evidence-based diagnostic procedures and laboratory studies to confirm the diagnoses and/or causative agents.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area VII: Communicate, Promote, and Advocate for Health, Health Education/Promotion, and the Profession
7.2 Engage in advocacy for health and health education/promotion


Infectious Diseases - Chuuk/Hawaii/Pacific: Applying the Knowledge (Part II)

Nursing CE: 2.4 CHES®-CECH: 2.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 2 hr (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Physicians, Nurses, Dentists, Pharmacists, Veterinarians, Emergency Medical Services personnel, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Infectious Diseases - Applying the Knowledge Part 2” is a modified version of a Problem-Based Learning or PBL case previously completed by multidisciplinary groups of health care students and professionals. PBL is a process of self-directed learning through identification and research of issues relevant to particular disciplines.

  • Infectious Disease in Chuuk explores the questions and consequences evoked by an infectious disease present in Chuuk.
  • Emerging Infectious Disease Outbreak explores the questions and consequences evoked by a potential emerging infectious disease outbreak in Hawaii.
  • Infectious Disease in Hawaii explores the questions and consequences evoked by an infectious disease outbreak in Hawaii.

This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology with the aid of Dr. Seiji Yamada and Megan Inada. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify significant signs and symptoms that lead to a diagnosis of Tuberculosis.
  2. Take appropriate preventative measures to reduce the likelihood of contracting Tuberculosis.
  3. Identify significant signs and symptoms that lead to a diagnosis of dengue.
  4. Institute appropriate public health prevention measures to mitigate an outbreak of dengue.
  5. Identify the signs and symptoms associated with a case of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).
  6. Identify proper public health interventions for dealing with an infectious disease outbreak.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. Demonstrate the ability to take medical histories that identify symptoms associated with exposure to CBRNE agents.
2. Demonstrate the ability to rule out, when possible, or determine an accurate diagnosis of exposure to CBRNE agents.
3. List and describe the public health interventions that are part of a response to surveillance signals.
5. Demonstrate the ability to incorporate evidence-based diagnostic procedures and laboratory studies to confirm the diagnoses and/or causative agents.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area VII: Communicate, Promote, and Advocate for Health, Health Education/Promotion, and the Profession
7.2 Engage in advocacy for health and health education/promotion


Medical Reserve Corps

Hawaii Department of Health: Medical Reserve Corps

Nursing CE: 2.4 CHES®-CECH: 2.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 2 hr (Original copyright 2006-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, Other Emergency Medical Services personnel


The “Hawaii Department of Health: Medical Reserve Corps ” course is the introductory training for Hawaii Medical Reserve Corps volunteers. This course defines and explains the role of the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) and its volunteers, introduces the Incident Command System (ICS) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS), covers the 8 MRC core competencies, and elucidates the importance of personal emergency planning. The sequence tutorials, “Medical Reserve Corps Development and Overview,” feature a presentation delivered by Dr. Kate Gaynor, Dr. Kristine Qureshi, and Ms. Tara Nash, covers basics about the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC), including its role in a disaster, its policies and structure, and the 8 core competencies of the MRC.

This course was created by the Hawaii Department of Health with the assistance of Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. The presentation was recorded at Pacific EMPRINTS’ 2008 Pacific Preparedness Conference: Capacity Building to Address Vulnerable Populations, on January 16, 2008. Creation of the course was funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Know what the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) is and why it is important.
  • Understand your role in the MRC.
  • Explain the importance of the Incident Command System and following the chain of command during any MRC disaster response activity.
  • List and explain the 8 MRC Core Competencies.
  • Explain why a family emergency plan is important.
  • Explain how the Medical Reserve Corps originated.
  • Understand the potential response roles for the MRC volunteer.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel

1. Explain the concepts of and describe functional response roles for one’s profession, health agencies, and community members.
2. Explain the concept of incident command system and describe its functional components.
3. List and describe the members of the local emergency management system and describe one’s role within it.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices


Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters - Hurricanes and Tsunamis

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hr (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Physicians, Nurses, Dentists, Pharmacists, Veterinarians, Emergency Medical Services personnel, Other Public Health personnel


The course “Natural Disasters" gives a brief overview of hurricanes and tsunamis.

  • "Hurricanes" tutorial covers the formation and power of hurricanes. It also provides emergency response worker guidelines for Personal Protective Equipment, promotes awareness of hurricane hazards, and addresses other topics relevant to public health and hurricanes.
  • “Tsunamis” tutorial examines the causes, history, and devastating power of tsunamis. It also prepares the enrollee to recognize health concerns that are caused by tsunamis and provides protective measures for health care personnel and others to take in the event of a tsunami.
  • “Tsunami in Sri Lanka: Applying the Knowledge” was created with the aid of Dr. Seiji Yamada and Megan Inada. Those tutorials explore the questions and consequences evoked by a tsunami in Sri Lanka using a modified version of a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) format, previously completed by multidisciplinary groups of health care students and professionals. The PBL is a process of self-directed learning through identification and research of issues relevant to particular disciplines.
  • “The Survivors Tell Their Stories: The 2004 Sumatra and 2006 Java Tsunamis in Indonesia” was created with the aid of Walter C. Dudley, Phd, a Professor of Marine Geology and Oceanography at the University of Hawaii at Hilo. Two tutorials provide a re-telling of several personal tsunami survivor stories. In addition, the role of storytelling in tsunami preparedness is discussed, as are various issues which still need to be addressed to ensure effective tsunami response.
This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Grant No. T01HP6427-0100. “The Survivors Tell Their Stories: The 2004 Sumatra and 2006 Java Tsunamis in Indonesia” tutorial was funded by FY 2008 Homeland Security Grant Program #2008-GE-T8-0022 via the Hawaii State Civil Defense and NOAA Pacific.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the causes, strength, speed, and destructive force of a hurricane.
  2. Take appropriate preventative measures to reduce the likelihood of contracting illness from contaminated water and contaminated food.
  3. Recognize potential health hazards while working in relief efforts during and following a hurricane.
  4. Describe the established guidelines for Personal Protective Equipment for emergency workers and safe handling of human remains.
  5. Understand the causes, strength, speed, and destructive force of a tsunami.
  6. Take appropriate preventative measures to reduce the likelihood of contracting illness from contaminated water.
  7. Recognize potential health hazards while working in relief efforts during and following a tsunami.
  8. Identify the dangers associated with mass disposal of human remains.
  9. Identify the infectious organisms likeliest to be present in the aftermath of a tsunami.
  10. Describe the role of oral history in tsunami preparedness.
  11. Identify at least three issues which should be addressed to provide effective tsunami response.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. Explain the concepts of and describe functional response roles for one’s profession, health agencies, and community members.
2. List and describe the different phases of disasters.
3. Explains the concepts and describes selected methods of hazards risk assessment and all hazards planning.
4. Describe functional response roles for one’s profession, health agencies, and community members.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices


Natural Disasters - Volcanic Emissions and Volcanic Volatiles

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hr (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, Other Emergency Medical Services personnel


The course “Natural Disasters - Volcanic Eruptions" gives a brief overview of volcanic eruptions.

  • “Vog & Kilauea Volcanic Emissions” by Barbara Brooks, PhD, provides a brief overview of the components of vog, or volcanic smog, the health effects of vog, and how to protect against vog, with specific examples relating to Kilauea Volcano and the Big Island of Hawaii. Additional resources are also mentioned. Dr. Brooks is the State Toxicologist with the Hazard Evaluation and Emergency Response Office, Hawaii Department of Health (HDOH).
  • “Volcanic Volatiles: Toxicity and Chronic & Acute Effects of Exposure” by Donald M. Thomas, PhD., MS., gives a brief overview of the primary volcanic gases of concern, their effects, and treatment for those effects. This course also introduces a classification system for the modes of action of the various volcanic gases. Case studies and public health concerns are also discussed. Dr. Thomas is the Director of the Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes at the University of Hawaii at Hilo, a geochemist with the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics, and managed all phases of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project and a chair of the National Energy Laboratory of Hawaii Authority (NELHA) Board of Directors and the Hawaii State Earthquake Advisory Committee, and a member of the Hawaii Hazards Forum.
This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Anthropology. Creation of the course was funded by FY 2008 Homeland Security Grant Program #2008-GE-T8-0022.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Define “vog.”
  2. Identify the major components of vog.
  3. Describe the main health issues associated with vog.
  4. Identify protective measures to prevent and protect against exposure to vog.
  5. List the primary volcanic gases of concern.
  6. Differentiate between the modes of action of the various volcanic gases.
  7. Identify protective measures against volcanic gases.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. Describe the principles of and demonstrate the ability to select appropriate personal protective equipment.
2. Within the scope of one’s professional practice, initiate physiological and psychological interventions for treatment of biological, chemical, radiological, and mass trauma injuries.
3. List and describe the public health interventions that are part of a response to surveillance signals.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices


Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive Threats

Introduction to Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive Events/Case Study

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hr (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health Personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, Epidemiologists


This course is designed to give a brief overview of radiological, nuclear and explosive threats. The sequence tutorials, “Terrorism in Hawaii: Applying the Knowledge,” explores the questions and consequences evoked by a terrorist incident in Chicago, while "the Convention Center Incident: Applying the Knowledge" explores the questions and consequences evoked by a terrorist incident at the Hawaii Convention Center using a modified version of a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) format, previously completed by multidisciplinary groups of health care students and professionals. The PBL is a process of self-directed learning through identification and research of issues relevant to particular disciplines.

  • Explosive Threats covers a brief overview of explosive threats, types of explosive agents, the Bomb Threat Injury Model, and different types of blast injury. Explosive threats precautions and response indications are also discussed.
  • Nuclear & Radiological Threats tutorial covers a brief overview of nuclear and radiological threats, ionizing radiation, types of dispersal devices, complications arising from nuclear and radiological exposure, and treatment and prevention measures used to combat nuclear and radiological exposure.
This course was created by Pacific EMPRINTS, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. “Terrorism in Hawaii: Applying the Knowledge” tutorials were created with the aid of Seiji Yamada, MD. "The Convention Center Incident: Applying the Knowledge" tutorial was created with the aid of Seiji Yamada, MD, MPH, and Megan Inada, MPH. Creation of the course was funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the various types of explosive threats.
  2. Identify the three main components of the Bomb Threat Injury model.
  3. Describe the condition known as “blast lung,” and its evaluation and management.
  4. Identify the three fundamental principles of radiation exposure.
  5. Describe Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS).
  6. Identify three public health radiation myths.
  7. Identify the principles of treating the injured in the aftermath of a nuclear detonation.
  8. Select proper personal protective measures in the wake of a nuclear detonation.
  9. Institute appropriate triage measures in a Mass Casualty Incident.
  10. Select appropriate mitigation measures for the general public in the event of a detonation of a Radiological Dispersal Device.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. List the major classes of weapons and prevention strategies for each of them.
2. Within the scope of one’s professional practice, initiate physiological and psychological interventions for treatment of mass trauma injuries.
3. Demonstrate the ability to recognize the need for, and to collect and preserve, forensic evidence from patients who may be victims of a CBRNE event.
4. List the types of radiation associated with potential terrorist activity and describe their routes of exposure, associated illnesses, and treatments.
5. Within the scope of one’s professional practice, initiate physiological interventions for treatment of radiological injuries.
6. Explain the concepts of and describe functional response roles for one’s profession, health agencies, and community members.
7. List the types of radiation associated with potential terrorist activity and describe their routes of exposure, associated illnesses, and treatments.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices


Vulnerable Populations

Vulnerable Populations - Cultural Competencies

Nursing CE: 2.4 CHES®-CECH: 2.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 2 hrs (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, Other Emergency Medical Services personnel


The online course “Vulnerable Populations Cultural Competencies” includes the following three presentations:

  • “Strategically Reaching LEP Communities: Perspectives of Medical Interpreters for Emergency Preparedness” delivered by Dr. Sharyne Shiu Thornton covers a study performed by Dr. Thornton on the disaster-related training experiences and training needs of medical interpreters. It also includes suggestions on how to incorporate medical interpreters and their language communities in disaster preparedness.
  • “Cultural Competency and Disaster Mental Health” features an interview with Dr. Sharyne Shiu Thornton, PhD. Topics covered include disaster mental health, medical interpreter preparedness, cultural competency, and the role of culture following a disaster.
  • “Building Cultural Competence in Disaster Preparedness and Response” delivered by Ken Lee, MSW covers the definition of cultural competence, 9 Guiding Principles for Cultural Competence in Disaster Response, and important considerations for cross-cultural interactions.

This presentation was recorded at Pacific EMPRINTS’ 2008 Pacific Preparedness Conference: Capacity Building to Address Vulnerable Populations, on January 16, 2008. This Conference was funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this online course, participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the role, training background, and interpreting experiences of medical interpreters specific to emergency/disaster preparedness
  2. Identify approaches for integrating medical interpreters into preparedness planning and response.
  3. Identify strategies proposed by interpreters to best reach LEP populations in preparedness planning and education.
  4. Describe methods to better integrate medical interpreters into the disaster response system.
  5. Identify how culture affects the healing process.
  6. Describe cultural humility and its role in cultural competence.
  7. Understand the importance of designing culturally sensitive approaches in disaster planning and response.
  8. Describe methods and practical tools to evaluate a program’s level of cultural sensitivity.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

Explain the concepts of and describe functional response roles for one’s profession, health agencies, and community members.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
3.3.4 Apply principles of diversity and cultural competence in implementing health education/promotion plan
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.7 Apply findings


Vulnerable Populations in Disasters (Part I) - Planning/Stakeholder Coordination

Nursing CE: 2.4 CHES®-CECH: 2.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 2 hrs (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, Other Emergency Medical Services personnel


The online course “Vulnerable Populations in Disasters Part 1” includes:

  • “Counting Upon the Kindness & Expertise of Others: Serving Vulnerable Individuals & Families in Times of Disaster” features a keynote address delivered by Dr. Jeanette Takamura. The presentation describes three at-risk population segments: older Americans, persons with disabling conditions, and persons with limited English proficiency. In addition, the presentation identifies components of systems-based interventions, and provides resources for those who work with these populations.
  • “Vulnerable Populations in Disasters: Reducing Impact through Planning, Plan Writing and Plan Execution” features a presentation delivered by Dr. Paul Heiderscheidt covers incorrect assumptions made about written plans, effective planning and plan writing, and introduces the Automated Disaster Electronic Planning Tool (ADEPT).

The keynote and presentations wre recorded at Pacific EMPRINTS’ 2008 Pacific Preparedness Conference: Capacity Building to Address Vulnerable Populations, on January 16, 2008. This Conference was funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this online course, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe three at-risk population segments in the U.S.
    2. Identify components of systems-based interventions for at-risk populations during a disaster.
  2. Differentiate between planning, plan writing, and plan execution.
  3. Understand the elements of a useful plan and proper planning.
  4. Describe how proper planning and plan writing techniques can protect vulnerable populations.
  5. Apply established best practices to planning.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. Describe functional response roles for one’s profession, health agencies, and community members.
2. Describe public health interventions that are a part of a response to surveillance signals.
3. List the governmental resources and outline the regulatory issues associated with emergency management and response.
4. Explain the concepts and describe selected methods of hazard risk assessment and all hazards planning.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


Vulnerable Populations in Disasters (Part II) - Lessons Learned/GIS Mapping and Tracking Vulnerable Populations

Nursing CE: 2.4 CHES®-CECH: 2.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 2 hrs (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, Other Emergency Medical Services personnel


The online course includes “Vulnerable Populations in Disasters Part 2” includes 2 presentations:

  • “Improving Preparedness by Incorporating Lessons Learned” by Linda Landesman, DrPH, MSW reviews key disasters that occurred in the past century with a focus on what was learned from each. Challenges for communities in incorporating these lessons into actions that reduce morbidity and mortality are discussed, and suggestions are offered as to how to begin formalizing next steps in lessons learned.
  • “Mapping and Tracking Vulnerable Populations Using Geospatial Technologies” by Ms. Christina Finch covers the importance of spatial perspectives and GIS in all phases of emergency management and GIS tools and capabilities to identify vulnerable populations and inform evidence-based decision making

These presentation were recorded at Pacific EMPRINTS’ 2010 Pacific Preparedness Conference: Capacity Building to Address Vulnerable Populations in Natural Disasters, on March 31, 2010. This Conference was funded by the FY 2008 Homeland Security Grant Program #2008-GE-T8-0022 via the Hawaii State Civil Defense.

Objectives

By the end of this online course, participants will be able to:

  1. Differentiate between planning, plan writing, and plan execution.
  2. Understand the elements of a useful plan and proper planning.
  3. Describe how proper planning and plan writing techniques can protect vulnerable populations.
  4. Apply established best practices to planning.
  5. Understand the common morbidity and mortality caused by disasters.
  6. Identify key outcomes of disasters.
  7. Incorporate lessons learned from previous disasters into future planning efforts.
  8. Understand the importance of spatial perspectives and GIS in all phases of emergency management.
  9. Discuss socioeconomic characteristics that influence a person, group’s or community's ability to prepare, respond, cope or recover from a hazard event
  10. Demonstrate the use of GIS tools and how that can identify vulnerable populations and inform evidence-based decision making.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. Explain the concepts and describe selected methods of hazard risk assessment and all hazards planning.
2. List and describe the different phases of disasters.
3. Describe evaluation activities such as table-top drills.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


Vulnerable Populations - Pregnant Women and Children with Special Needs

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hrs (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacist, Dentists, Veterinarians, Other Emergency Medical Services personnel


The online course “Vulnerable Populations: Pregnant Women and Children with Special Needs” features two presentations:

  • “Emergency Preparedness for Children With Special Health Care Needs” updated 2010 delivered by Loren Yamamoto, MD, MPH, MBA, FAAP, FACEP. Topics covered include the technology and infrastructure dependence of children with special health care needs, their vulnerabilities, and approaches for ensuring their preparedness. The Emergency Information Form is discussed, as are electrical power basics. This presentation was recorded at Pacific EMPRINTS’ 2010 Pacific Preparedness Conference: Capacity Building to Address Vulnerable Populations in Natural Disasters, on March 31, 2010. This Conference was funded by the FY 2008 Homeland Security Grant Program #2008-GE-T8-0022 via the Hawaii State Civil Defense.
  • “Disasters and Pregnancy” by Dr. Pierre Buekens covers Dr. Buekens’ research on pregnant women in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, and addressed the issues pregnant women face in a disaster, including the effects of disaster on birth outcomes, postpartum depression, and the frequency of PTSD. This presentation was recorded at Pacific EMPRINTS’ 2008 Pacific Preparedness Conference: Capacity Building to Address Vulnerable Populations, which took place on January 16, 2008, at the Hilton Waikiki Prince Kuhio Hotel. This Conference was funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this he online course, participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the role of the Emergency Information Form (EIF) in emergency/disaster preparedness.
  2. Identify quality improvement programs in emergency/disaster preparedness.
  3. List electrical power failure back-up strategies.
  4. Understand the impact of hurricanes on birth outcomes.
  5. Understand the impact of hurricanes on postpartum depression and the frequency on post-traumatic stress disorder.
  6. Identify public health interventions to support pregnant women and postpartum women exposed to hurricanes and their aftermath.

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. Describe functional response roles for one’s profession, health agencies, and community members.
2. Describe public health interventions that are a part of a response to surveillance signals.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


Vulnerable Populations - Seniors

Nursing CE: 3.0 CHES®-CECH: 2.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 2.5 hrs (Original copyright 2007-2017 Pacific EMPRINTS All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel, Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Dentists, Veterinarians, Other Emergency Medical Services personnel


The online course includes two presentations:

  • “Older Adults: Vulnerable During Disasters” by Karen Lamb, DNP, APRN, BC covers the key concerns that may arise for older adults caught in disasters, such as sensory deprivation, the multiple loss effect, and chronic health issues, and what can be done to make older adults less vulnerable.
  • “Extending ‘Interoperability‘ to Vulnerable Populations” by David Kingdon, MPH, EMT-P includes the definition of interoperability, how interoperability currently is and is not being built into various emergency response systems, and how public health and emergency service strategies can be used to improve interoperability. The presentation also covers some examples of collaboration and basics of the Incident Command System.

This Conference was funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Grant No. T01HP6427-0100.

Objectives

By the end of this online course, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe 12 key characteristics impacting the older adult’s response to disaster/emergency situations.
  2. dentify strategies for addressing special considerations for the older adult’s response to disaster/emergency situations.
  3. Define “Interoperability” in terms of disaster preparedness and response.
  4. Apply examples of collaboration between service organizations and public health and safety to their own working environment.
  5. Understand relevant public health preparedness strategies (e.g. assets mapping, epidemiologic surveillance, program evaluation).
  6. Understand relevant emergency services strategies (e.g. incident command, decontamination, triage/treatment).

Core Competencies, in part, fulfilled by this course
for Teaching Emergency Preparedness to Health Professions Students and Clinical Personnel:

1. Describe functional response roles for one’s profession, health agencies, and community members.
2. List and describe the public health interventions that are part of a response to surveillance signals.
3. Explain the concept of incident command system and describe its functional components.

for Health Education Specialists

Area I: Assess Needs, Resources, and Capacity for Health Education/Promotion
1.4 Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health
Area II: Plan Health Education/Promotion
2.1 Involve priority populations, partners and other stakeholders in the planning process
2.3 Select or design strategies/interventions
Area III: Implement Health Education/Promotion
3.2.4 Develop training using best practices
Area IV: Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.1 Develop evaluation plan for health education/promotion
4.3 Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data
4.5 Analyze data
4.6 Interpret data
4.7 Apply findings


"A Natural Disasters Safety and Readiness Guide for Seniors in Hawaii" (PDF)
This project was funded by the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors (NACDD) Opportunities Grants for Healthy Aging Request for Applications, RFA#HA2008
Project Lead - State of Hawaii Department of Health Community Health Division
Project Coordinator - Pacific EMPRINTS
For more information to inquire about "A Natural Disasters Safety and Readiness Guide for Seniors in Hawaii", contact Dr. Ann Sakaguchi at emprints@hawaii.edu

Program Evaluation

Introduction to Evaluating Health Program

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hrs (Original copyright 2000-2010 Pacific PHTC All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health personnel


The online course by Corinne McDaniels, MPH at SDSU IPH includes 4 tutorials:

  • "Evaluation Basics" covers Definition of Evaluation, Why Evaluate?, Steps in Program Evaluation, Program Goals, Program Activities, and You Try It! Example
  • "Developing Objectives" covers Program Objectives, Using Logic Models, Defines SMART Objectives, Program Problems, and Pitfalls and You Try It! Example
  • "Measuring Objectives" covers Measuring Program Objectives, Data Collection Methods and Tips, Evaluation Plans, Evaluation Implementation, Common Pitfalls, and You Try It! Example
  • "Sharing Results" covers Sharing the results of an evaluation, Basic components of an evaluation report, Tips for writing reports, tables, and figures, and Using your evaluation results

Objectives

By the end of this online course, participants will be able to:

  1. Define program evaluation and understand why it is important
  2. Describe the steps in developing and implementing a program evaluation
  3. Recognize the what, why, and how of program goals
  4. Determine the program activities that will further the program goals
  5. Create program objectives as measurable statements
  6. Describe the difference between process and outcome objectives
  7. Design objectives using SMART qualities
  8. Avoid many of the common problems and pitfalls in developing program objectives
  9. Determine how to measure program objectives
  10. Describe various measurement methods
  11. Recognize who and what to measure
  12. Create and implement an evaluation plan
  13. Understand the common pitfalls of data collection
  14. Write an evaluation report that is appropriate to the intended audience
  15. Identify and implement the basic components of an evaluation report
  16. Create meaningful table and figures for your report
  17. Share your results even when objectives are not met

Public Health 101

Public Health 101 Introducation

Nursing CE: 1.8 CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 2 hrs (Original copyright 2010-2015 Ca-Nv PHTC All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health professionals


This PH 101 course includes five popular CaNv PHTC's PH101 tutorials:

  • “Introduction to Public Health" providing an overview of the most important issues involving public health practice. This tutorial defines public health and provides a brief history as well as significant accomplishments of public health.
  • "Where Does Better Health Begin? Levels of Prevention and Intervention," by Michele Wood, PhD - CSU Fullerton, focuses on determinants of disease, different levels of prevention, and the ecological model as a framework for viewing intervention strategies.
  • "Measuring Health Status and Basic Epidemiology Methods" provides an overview of basic epidemiologic methods and describes health indicators and how they are used in public health.
  • "Health Policy and Ethics in Public Health" discusses health policy, including the policy making process and different settings in which health policy plays a role. There is also a discussion of ethics and ethical guidelines for public health professionals.
  • "Determinants of Health and Health Disparities" provides an overview of determinants of health and explores why health disparities occur and how they may be addressed by public health professionals. A brief discussion of the notion of health equity is included.
  • "Health Communication" provides information on health communication theories and methods, including factors that lead to good communication.

Objectives

By the end of this online course, participants will be able to:

  1. List two defining characteristics of public health.
  2. Identify the 10 essential public health services
  3. Describe the history of public health in the U.S.
  4. List at least 2 significant public health achievements.
  5. Define and apply the 3 levels of prevention
  6. Distinguish among the 3 primary public health intervention strategies and how they apply to public health practice
  7. Understand the Ecological model as it applies to public health practice
  8. Describe health indicators and identify data sources used for them
  9. Explain how health indicators are used in public health
  10. Explain the differences between proportions, rates, and ratios
  11. Define health policy and its purpose
  12. Identify different health policy settings
  13. Describe the policy making process
  14. Discuss basic ethical principles of public health
  15. Define health
  16. Describe 5 categories of determinants of health
  17. Define health disparities and provide examples
  18. Define health equity
  19. Understand how communication fits into the role of public health
  20. Explain how communication fits into the ecological model of public health and supports public health objectives
  21. Identify key principles of communication theory
  22. Describe factors that affect good communication

Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals, in part, fulfilled by this course
Domain 1: Analytic Assessment Skills
Domain 2: Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
Domain 3: Communication Skills
Domain 5: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
Domain 6: Public Health Sciences Skills


Public Health Program Planning

CHES®-CECH: 1.5 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 1.5 hrs (Original copyright 2010-2015 Ca-Nv PHTC All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health professionals


The online course includes 4 tutorials:

  • "Introduction," by Semran Mann, MPH, CHES - Loma Linda University School of Public Health, covers the basic elements of program planning. Different program planning phases as well as guiding principles for planning are presented.
  • "Needs and Assets," by Rachel Long, MPH, CEPR - Loma Linda University School of Public Health, covers the groundwork necessary for effective program development. Participants will learn about what a needs and assets assessment is, why it is important, the essential components and will go through the steps of how to conduct their own assessments.
  • "Applying Behavior Change Theory to Public Health Programs," by Joshua Yang, PhD - CSU Fullerton, provides a basic orientation and overview of health theory, along with a rationale for using theory to design public health programs. The Social-Ecological Model will serve as a framework for selecting appropriate theories to guide different types of programs. For each level of the Social Ecological Model, one or more major health theories will be presented, along with an applied example of each.
  • "Program Development Approaches," by Semran Mann, MPH, CHES - Loma Linda University School of Public Health, shows a step by step look at how to actually develop a program plan using the information learned from the earlier sessions. Participants will learn how to construct mission statements, vision statements, goals, objectives, and get a brief look at intervention strategies.

Objectives

By the end of this online course, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the determinants of health and how they interact
  2. Define foundational concepts and terminology commonly used in program planning
  3. Describe the 3 stages of program planning
  4. To identify the purpose of a needs assessment
  5. To identify the purpose of collecting methods
  6. To identify the purpose of an assessment process
  7. Understand how to select theories to fit programs
  8. Apply theoretical constructs into program activities
  9. Review the sociological model of health and the public health program pyramid
  10. Introduce the concept of program theory
  11. Discuss the key aspects of the PRECEDE-PROCEED model

The Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals, in part, fulfilled by this course
Domain: Domain 1: Analytic Assessment Skills
Domain 2: Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
Domain 3: Communication Skills
Domain 5: Community Dimensions of Practice Skills
Domain 6: Public Health Sciences Skills

Public Health Program Planning (Part II)

Nursing CE: 2.4 CHES®-CECH: 2.0 CEU Fee: $ 5
Duration: 2 hrs (Original copyright 2010-2015 Ca-Nv PHTC All Rights Reserved)
Audience: Public Health professionals


The online course includes five tutorials.

  • "Planning Your Program," by Rachel Long, MPH, CEPR and Semran Mann, MPH, CHES - Loma Linda University School of Public Health, covers how to develop mission statements, goals, and objectives that guide the program planning process.
  • "Implementation - Delivering Your Program," by Rachel Long, MPH, CEPR - Loma Linda University School of Public Health, takes participants through the process of selecting an intervention strategy to reach their desired program outcome. Participants will get an overview of the types of intervention strategies for: Health communication, Health education, Health Policy enforcement, Environmental change, Health related community services, Community mobilization and additional strategies. Participants will gain a better understanding of the guidelines for developing health promotion interventions and how to design appropriate interventions to meet their needs.
  • "Evaluation - Purpose and Process," by Semran Mann, MPH, CHES - Loma Linda University School of Public Health, includes an overview of the purpose of evaluation, what the process looks like, and how to plan for an evaluation, including theoretical frameworks used.
  • "Evaluation - Findings and Reporting," by Semran Mann, MPH, CHES - Loma Linda University School of Public Health, provides participants a more in-depth understanding of interpreting and reporting evaluation data. In addition to the various applications of evaluation findings, participants will learn when, how, and why to to share evaluation findings.
  • "Developing a Program Budget," by Atif Adam, PhD(c), MD, MPH and Semran Mann, MPH, CHES - Loma Linda University School of Public Health, takes participants through the steps of developing a program budget. Participants learn about the different budget components, what to consider when building a budget for each component, as well as a suggested timeline for development.

Objectives

By the end of this online course, participants will be able to:

  1. Review the program planning cycle
  2. Define mission statements, goals, and objectives
  3. Describe 5 types of objectives
  4. Define the 5 phases of implementation
  5. Identify considerations regarding implementation
  6. Define evaluation and its purpose
  7. Describe the 6 steps to evaluation
  8. Discuss potential barriers to evaluation
  9. Define 3 types of evaluation and where they fit in the timeline of a program
  10. Describe the purpose and process of reporting the evaluation findings
  11. Describe the purpose of a budget
  12. Provide an overview of the basic concepts in regards to budgets
  13. Describe the components of a budget

Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals, in part, fulfilled by this course
Domain 1: Analytic Assessment Skills
Domain 2: Policy Development/Program Planning Skills
Domain 8: Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills
Domain 7: Financial Planning and Management Skills


For more information concerning Professional Education activities, please contact: InstituteforPublicHealth@sdsu.edu

Accreditation Information

NURSING CREDITS GRANTED BY THE INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH: Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP17194.

CATEGORY I CONTINUING EDUCATION CONTACT HOURS (CECH) GRANTED BY THE INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH: Multiple Event Provider approved by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. Provider Number 101840.

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